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Instead of
being in the classroom, several students from Broad Ripple Magnet High School for the Arts and Humanities spent the day at the market on May
25. They actually visited two, The Fresh Market and Market District, to learn
about different cultures, nutrition and healthy eating — all through food.

 

The students
are members of the Culture Club (high school students) and the Cooking and
Nutrition Club (middle school students).

Brad Ripple Culture Club and Cooking and Nutrition Club  

While at The
Fresh Market, 5415 N. College Ave., the group toured the store and discussed
making healthy eating choices and organic versus nonorganic. The tour was
hosted by Fresh Market employees, Martha Schulz, Linda Rogers and Antione
Dickerson. Each student received a Fresh Market shopping tote and were allowed
to take samples of any fruit and or vegetable in the produce department.

 

During their
visit to Market District, 11505 N. Illinois St., students learned about the
various facts and myths of nutrition and the new food plate from registered
dietitian Molly Ault.

 

They were
treated to many tasty, healthy treats at both stores, ranging from Jamaican
coffee to roasted chipotle chicken salad. In between visiting both markets, the
group walked the Monon Trail for exercise.

 

The Broad
Ripple students were chaperoned by teachers Nikia Garland, Denise Johnson and
magnet professional Martha Riley, who have worked hard to expose the students
to a myriad of foods from different cultures as well as foods that offer the
best nutritional value for young adults.

 

“Each
teacher was allowed to pick a club to facilitate and I chose Culture,
specifically focusing on the food aspect,” said Garland. “I’ve traveled abroad
a lot and had the opportunity to try many different foods (camel being the most
exotic) and I wanted to share that with my kids. I wanted them to see that
there is a world out here that they only have to be willing try it.”

 

Garland said
since the inception of the Culture Club, her students have dined on food from
Mexico, China, Korea, Jamaica, England, Japan, Africa and the Middle East.

 

“Mrs.
Johnson’s driving force (through the Cooking and Nutrition Club) is to teach
the kids how to eat healthy and the importance of exercise in light of
childhood obesity,” said Garland.

 

She said the
hospitality offered by both stores was amazing and greatly appreciated.