Our school leaders make day-to-day decisions that impact the learning environment and service their school communities. Now, Indianapolis Public Schools is shifting toward a service model where school leaders are even more empowered to design instructional and operational plans to improve student achievement and the central office provides schools what they need to make that happen. Here’s a quick update on the most recent developments regarding Autonomy in IPS.

 

 

Our school leaders make day-to-day decisions that impact the learning environment and service their school communities. Now, Indianapolis Public Schools is shifting toward a service model where school leaders are even more empowered to design instructional and operational plans to improve student achievement and the central office provides schools what they need to make that happen. Here’s a quick update on the most recent developments regarding Autonomy in IPS.

 

Autonomy Cohort

This week, leaders of our six pilot schools met with members of Education Resource Strategies (ERS) to outline immediate needs and to streamline those needs in alignment with each school’s vision.

 

As a reminder, the selected pilot Autonomous schools, announced last week, are:

 

Arlington Woods School 99, led by Principal Tihesha Guthrie
Harshman Middle School, led by Principal James Larkin
Center for Inquiry School 2, led by Principal Andrea Hunley
Center for Inquiry School 27, led by Principal Jamilyn Bertsch
Center for Inquiry School 84, currently led by Principal Christine Collier

Center for Inquiry School 70 (new school to open in 2016-2017 SY), to be led by Principal and Center for Inquiry Founder Christine Collier

 

Arlington Woods School 99, once operating under the Project RESTORE model, is now functioning as an autonomy cohort pilot. In previous years under the Project RESTORE model, Arlington Woods progressed from being labeled a C school to an A school designation. Seeking opportunities for continued growth and after receiving buy-in from two-thirds of staff and families, they will transition to an autonomous school.

 

“We’re going to use all of the practices that have worked for us; now it’s time to take the next steps to maintain success. ERS will help take us to the next level. We consider Project RESTORE Phase I, now it’s on to Phase II,” says Arlington Woods Principal Tihesha Guthrie.

 

A series of meetings are forthcoming for Arlington Woods families and community members to continue to voice their thoughts and to gain key information about the impending changes.

 

“We’re having a great year, we have a lot of great new teachers that are dedicated to making positive strides and maintaining achievement,” says Principal Guthrie.

 

Student-Based Budgeting

A major component behind the Autonomous school model is Student-Based Budgeting (SBB.) By allocating funds to schools based on student enrollment and need, schools will experience increased flexibility along with an improved funding system. A common misconception around SBB is that funds are being removed from schools, when in reality, this model will focus on strategically utilizing those resources to strengthen student achievement and address equity. In our evolution toward school autonomy, Indianapolis Public Schools is devoted to continued communication and transparency to help our community understand the dynamics of how funding allocations impact our students. In collaboration with ERS and community stakeholders, IPS will continue to fine-tune the Student-Based Budgeting model in preparations for 2017-2018 implementation.